Colonel E.H. Taylor, Jr. Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

$9,998.99

This product is available in: CA, DC Unfortunately, we can't ship to PO Boxes and APO addresses.

Size750mL Proof100 (50% ABV)
A tornado hit Warehouse C in 2006, tearing through the roof and exposing the barrels within. During repairs, the barrels were exposed to the elements, resulting in a truly unique bourbon with an incredible story.

This product is available in: CA, DC Unfortunately, we can't ship to PO Boxes and APO addresses.

Notes

Note:  Once an order has been safely & successfully delivered, we do not accept returns due to change of heart or taste. Due to state regulations, we cannot accept the return of alcohol purchased by a customer in error.

Out of stock

About Colonel E.H. Taylor, Jr. Warehouse C Tornado Surviving Bourbon

The oldest continually operating distillery in the United States includes the rich legacies of master distillers such as E.H. Taylor, Jr, Albert B. Blanton, Orville Schupp, and Elmer T. Lee as well. To this day it remains family-owned, operating on the same 130 acres of land adjacent to the Kentucky River as it has for over 200 years. Similarly, the distillery’s flagship bourbon has been made using the same process for over 2 centuries. Now part of the Sazerac family, the distillery has remained dedicated to a single craft: the making of fine bourbon whiskey, bringing together tradition and innovation in the process.

In 2006 a tornado hit and damaged 2 of their warehouses. Warehouse C was built by E.H. Taylor in 1885 and was hit particularly hard, with a part of the roof being torn off. While repairs were underway, several barrels were exposed to the sun. Exposure to the elements and the warm climate influenced the bourbon within, causing rapid maturation. As luck would have it, the bourbon (aged between 9 years and 8 months to nearly 12 years) turned out to be delicious and very special. Bottled at 100 proof, it's a unique expression with an incredible story behind it.

Get your bottle of this tornado-surviving spirit today!

About E.H. Taylor, Jr.

In 1869, Taylor purchased a small distillery situated on the banks of the Kentucky River. After christening the distillery O.F.C Distillery (OFC was an abbreviation for Old Fire Copper), Taylor began renovating and modernizing the plant — he purchased copper fermentation tanks, new grain grinding equipment, and unique, columnar stills. During his tenure, Taylor also implemented several innovative distilling techniques, including aging bourbon in climate-controlled rickhouses.

At the time, an overwhelming number of distilleries were still not aging their whiskey. In order to make their spirits palatable, some distillers and retailers added juices and syrups to sweeten their bourbon, while others added acid and tobacco to give the whiskey its signature, amber hue.

Armed with distilling experience and a political pedigree, Taylor, together with Treasury Secretary John G. Carlisle, was instrumental in passing the Bottled-In-Bond Act of 1897 (27 C.F.R. 5.21). The act required that any spirit labeled as "Bonded" or "Bottled-in-Bond" be the product of one distiller at one distillery during one distillation season. In addition, the Act required that bonded spirits be aged in a federally bonded warehouse under U.S. government supervision for at least four years and bottled at 100 proof.

About Bourbon

There are not many things more American than bourbon, and although most of it is produced in Kentucky, it can be produced all over the USA.
It must be made with at least 51% corn and bottled at 40% ABV or higher. So why not give this American classic a try?


Check out our impressive selection of bourbons, find your new favorite in Top 10 bourbons, or explore our treasury of rare & hard to find bourbons.

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The nose opens with dried fig, cloves, baking spice, and oak. Fruit is on the palate with vanilla and hints of smoke, culminating in a spicy finish with a touch of tobacco.
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